All Faculty

Steve Radelet

Steven Radelet

Professor Radelet holds the Donald F. McHenry Chair in Global Human Development and is the Director of the Global Human Development Program. His work focuses on economic growth, poverty reduction, foreign aid, and debt, primarily in Africa and Asia. Dr. Radelet has extensive experience as a policy maker in the U.S. Government; as an adviser to developing country leaders; and as a researcher, teacher and writer. He previously served as Chief Economist for USAID, Senior Adviser for Development to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, and Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Treasury for Africa, the Middle East and Asia. He currently serves as an economic adviser to the President of Liberia, and previously was an adviser to the President of Malawi. He spent four years as a resident adviser to the Ministry of Finance in Jakarta, Indonesia, and two years as a resident adviser in the Ministry of Finance in The Gambia. He was a Peace Corps Volunteer in Western Samoa. From 2002 to 2009, Dr. Radelet was Senior Fellow at the Center for Global Development. From 1990 to 2000, he was on the faculty of Harvard University, where he was a Fellow at the Harvard Institute for International Development (HIID) and a Lecturer on Economics and Public Policy. He holds a PhD in public policy from Harvard University.

Ana-Maria Arriagada

Ana-Maria Arriagada

Ana-Maria Arriagada is a senior-level international development practitioner with extensive experience in the areas of social protection and safety nets, education, and health and nutrition. Her recent work focuses on scaling up alternative models to deliver social services to poor women and children in developing countries, especially in Indonesia and South Africa. Dr. Arriagada worked at the World Bank for 26 years concentrating on policy research, strategy and program design, implementation and evaluation, and organizational management. She held several senior technical and managerial positions including Social Protection Sector Manager and, later, Director for the Human Development Department for the Latin America and the Caribbean region. She twice received the World Bank’s President “Excellence Award” for cutting-edge work with country clients, pioneering innovative approaches to program design, implementation and management, including community managed schools and transparent financial management of social expenditures and poverty programs. She currently works with several international organizations and non-profits, and is a senior advisor for the Results for Development Institute. Dr. Arriagada holds a BA from the Catholic University of Chile—her native country, and an MA and PhD in Economics from American University.

Tony Barclay

Tony Barclay

Tony Barclay is Director of Development Management and Practice. For 30 years, Tony was a senior executive at DAI, an employee-owned international development consulting firm, and served as CEO from 1999 to 2008. During his tenure, DAI grew from a boutique firm to a global company with annual revenues of $375 million and 2,500 employees working in more than 50 countries. Honored as Executive of the Year in the October 2008 Greater Washington Government Contractor Awards ceremony, Tony has had a long career as a global development professional. He served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in western Kenya in the late 1960s, and returned there for his Ph.D. research in anthropology on the impact of a large-scale sugar project. He joined DAI’s development consulting staff in 1977. He moved into a senior management role in 1979, became DAI’s President in 1990; and succeeded the founding CEO in 1999. Tony was a founding board member of the U.S. Global Leadership Coalition and is a past President of the Washington Chapter of the Society for International Development. He has also taught management courses at UC Berkeley, Columbia’s School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA) in the Master’s in Development Practice (MDP) Program, and Columbia’s Middle East Research Center in Amman, Jordan.

Eduardo Velez Bustillo

Eduardo Velez Bustillo

Dr. Velez had a distinguished career at the World Bank, serving as the Education Sector Manager for East Asia and the Pacific, Education Sector Manager for Latin American and the Caribbean, Sector Coordinator (Human Development) for the China program, Sector Leader (Human and Social Development for Colombia, Mexico and Venezuela), and Human Development Cluster Leader for Uganda and Tanzania. He also served as Principal Education Specialist for Eastern and Southern Africa. Dr. Velez has also been a Visiting Professor at: Universidad Nacional, Bogotá; Brown University; University of Connecticut; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá; Universidad Pedagógica Nacional, Bogotá; the Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá; and most recently at Peking University and Kobe University. Dr. Velez has a Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Illinois. His areas of interest include Sociology of Social and Economic Development, Sociology of Education, and Analysis and Evaluation of Development Programs.

Derek Byerlee

Derek Byerlee

Derek Byerlee conducted his early studies in Australia before completing his PhD at Oregon State University and joining the Faculty of Agricultural Economics at Michigan State University, focusing on West Africa. He then worked for many years at the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center in Mexico and South Asia, finishing as Director of Economics. He moved to the World Bank in 1994, serving as its Rural Strategy Adviser and Co-Director of the World Development Report 2008 Agriculture for Development. He is currently a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University, and serves on a number of international boards and advisory bodies. He has published widely and is a Fellow of the Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

Shareen Joshi

Shareen Joshi

Professor Joshi’s research focuses on poverty alleviation and demographic change in the developing world. She is particularly interested in the evaluation of development policies using a mix of quantitative and qualitative methods. Her recent papers explore the effects of maternal and child health programs on the well-being of families in Bangladesh, and the impact of self-help group participation on the lives of women in rural Rajasthan, India. She is also interested in patterns of marriage and household structure across the developing world. Professor Joshi holds a PhD in Economics from Yale University.

Marko_Klasnja

Marko Klašnja

Marko Klašnja is an assistant professor of political science at Georgetown University, with the joint appointment in the Government Department and the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service. He specializes in comparative politics, political behavior, and political economy of democratic accountability. Prior to joining Georgetown, he was a post-doctoral fellow at the Center for the Study of Democratic Politics at Princeton University, and received his PhD from the Department of Politics at New York University.

Jeremy Konyndyk

Jeremy Konyndyk

Jeremy Konyndyk is a senior policy fellow at the Center for Global Development. His research focuses on humanitarian response, USAID policy reform, and global outbreak preparedness. He previously served in the Obama Administration from 2013-2017 as the director of USAID’s Office of US Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA), where he led the US government’s response to international disasters. Konyndyk led a global team of nearly 600 humanitarian professionals, managed annual resources of more than $1.4 billion, and oversaw OFDA’s responses to an average of 70 disasters in 50 countries every year. He led major US government humanitarian responses to the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, the 2016 Ethiopia Drought, the complex emergency in Northern Nigeria, the Nepal earthquake, the Iraq crisis, Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines, the conflict in South Sudan, and the ongoing war inside Syria, among other crises. He also led the Agency’s preparations for the 2016 World Humanitarian Summit. Konyndyk previously worked for Mercy Corps as director of Global Policy and Advocacy. From 2008-2013, he led the organization’s high-level strategic outreach to governments, donors, the United Nations, and other partners. From 2003-2008, he served as the American Refugee Committee’s country director in South Sudan, Uganda, and Guinea, designing and leading humanitarian responses in conflict and post-conflict settings. Konyndyk earlier worked with the US Department of State’s Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration, and for an NGO in the Balkans. He is currently a member of the World Health Organization’s high level Independent Oversight and Advisory Committee, which oversees the agency’s Health Emergencies Programme. Previously, he served on the independent Advisory Group to the WHO Director General that helped to design the agency’s post-Ebola emergency response reforms.

Sarah Lane

Sarah Lane

Sarah Lane is an economist in the USAID Office of Economic Policy. She has worked as a development economist for nearly a decade in USAID’s Asia Near East Bureau and Bureau for Economic Growth, Education and Environment. In recent years, she has worked extensively on the economic analysis of development projects with a particular focus on cost benefit analysis. She holds a B.S. in Mathematics and International Relations from the College of William and Mary, an M.A. in International Political Economy and Development from Fordham University, and an M.A. in Economics from Georgetown University.

Katherine Marshall

Katherine Marshall

Katherine Marshall has worked for almost four decades on international development, with a focus on issues facing the world’s poorest countries. She is a senior fellow at Georgetown’s Berkley Center for Religion, Peace and World Affairs and Professor of the Practice of Development, Conflict, and Religion in the School of Foreign Service. Her long career with the World Bank (1971-2006) involved a wide range of leadership assignments, many focused on Africa. From 2000-2006 her mandate covered ethics, values, and faith in development work,as counselor to the World Bank’s President. She was Country Director in the World Bank’s Africa region, first for the Sahel region, then Southern Africa. She then led the Bank’s work on social policy and governance during the East Asia crisis years. She worked extensively on Eastern Africa and Latin America. As a long time manager she was involved in many task forces and issues, among them exercises addressing leadership issues, conflict resolution, the role of women, and issues for values and ethics. Ms. Marshall has been closely engaged in the creation and development of the World Faiths Development Dialogue (WFDD) and is its Executive Director. She serves or has served on the Boards of several NGOs and advisory groups, including AVINA Americas, The International Shinto Foundation, the Niwano Peace Prize International Selection Committee, and the Opus Prize Foundation. She was part of the founding members of IDEA (International Development Ethics Association) and is part of the International Anti-Corruption Advisory Conference (IACC) advisory council. She is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. She served as a core group member of the Council of 100, an initiative of the World Economic Forum to advance understanding between the Islamic World and the West. She was a Trustee of Princeton University (2003-9). She co-moderated the Fes Forum which is part of the Fes Festival of World Sacred Music from its inception. She speaks and publishes widely on issues for international development. Ms. Marshall’s daughter is a physician in Seattle in family practice, following service in the Peace Corps. Her son recently completed an assignment with Americorps, writes about and performs electronic music, and is taking courses in computer science at Georgetown University.