All Faculty

Rehana Nathoo

Rehana Nathoo

Rehana is the Founder and CEO of Spectrum Impact, a strategy consulting company that supports a range of organizations, funds, and families that are looking to expand their impact investing footprint. Prior to this, Rehana led the impact investing portfolio at the Case Foundation and worked with Bank of New York Mellon to create a pilot impact investment fund, while also training their wealth management team on impact-related strategies. She led grant-making at the Rockefeller Foundation related to impact investing and spent the 2 years prior to that focused on project finance in East Africa with the UN Capital Development Fund. Rehana currently serves an adjunct professor at Georgetown’s Walsh School of Foreign Service on impact investing and global development.

Mead Over

Mead Over

Mead Over is a senior fellow at the Center for Global Development researching the economics of efficient, effective, and cost-effective health interventions in developing countries. Much of his work since 1987, first at the World Bank and now at the CGD, is on the economics of the AIDS epidemic. He co-authored the Bank’s first comprehensive treatment of the economics of AIDS in the book “Confronting AIDS: Public Priorities for a Global Epidemic” (1997,1999). His most recent book is “Achieving an AIDS Transition: Preventing Infections to Sustain Treatment” (2011) in which he offers options for donors, recipients, activists and other participants in the fight against HIV to reverse the trend in the epidemic through better prevention. In addition to ongoing work on HIV/AIDS, he is working on optimal pricing of health care services at the periphery, on the measurement and explanation of the efficiency of health service delivery in poor countries, and on optimal interventions to control a global influenza pandemic. Professor Over serves as a member of PEPFAR’s Scientific Advisory Board and as a member of the Steering Committee of the HIV/AIDS modeling consortium funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. He earned his PhD in economics at the University of Wisconsin, and served in the US Peace Corps’ first program in Burkina Faso. He has taught at Williams College, Boston University, and the University of the Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand, France.

Laura Rawlings

Laura B. Rawlings

Laura B. Rawlings is a Lead Social Protection Specialist at the World Bank currently working primarily in Africa on strengthening social protection and labor systems. She was previously the Strategy and Results team leader in the World Bank’s Social Protection and Labor unit and manager of the Strategic Impact Evaluation Fund (SIEF). She worked in the Latin American and Caribbean region where she led numerous project and research initiatives in the areas of conditional cash transfers, social funds and social protection systems; and worked as Sector Leader for Human Development in Central America where she was responsible for coordinating the World Bank’s health, education and social protection portfolio. She began her career at the World Bank in the Development Research Group where she worked on the evaluation of social programs. Prior to joining the World Bank she worked for the Overseas Development Council. An economist by training, she has published books and articles in the fields of evaluation and human development.

Kinnon Scott

Kinnon Scott

Kinnon Scott is a Senior Economist in the Poverty and Equality Global practice. She is presently working in the Latin America and Caribbean region and manages the Poverty and Equity work program for Central America. She has co-authored Systematic Country Diagnostics for Panama and Guatemala looking at growth, inclusion and sustainability and is leading studies on female migrants in Mexico and the wiliness of higher income individuals to give up fuel subsides in El Salvador. Prior to this she was in the Poverty and Inequality within the World Bank’s Research Group where she managed the Living Standards Measurement Study. In this capacity she worked extensively with governments to produce policy-relevant data for poverty measurement and monitoring in many regions of the world. Professor Scott has been engaged in work on poverty measurement and highlights methodological research in household surveys (in areas of finance, income and consumption) as well as disability, the evolution of poverty and social protection targeting.

David Spielman

David J. Spielman

David J. Spielman, a U.S. national, joined the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in 2004, and is currently a senior research fellow based in Washington, DC. His research agenda covers a range of topics including agricultural science, technology and innovation policy; seed systems and input markets; and community-driven rural development. Prior to this, David was posted to Addis Ababa, Ethiopia with IFPRI’s Knowledge, Innovation, and Capacity Division. Earlier in his career, he worked on agriculture and rural development issues for the World Bank (Washington, D.C.), the Aga Khan Development Network (Pakistan), and several other organizations. His work maintains a regional emphasis on East Africa and South Asia. David received a Ph.D. in Economics from American University in 2003, an M.Sc. in Development Studies from the London School of Economics in 1993, and a B.A. in International Relations from Tufts University in 1992.

Griffin Thompson

Griffin Thompson

Professor Thompson has over 25 years of experience working on energy, climate, and development issues from a variety of institutional perspectives. He began his career at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), where he was detailed to the U.S. Export Council for Renewable Energy and managed the Asia program for the U.S. private sector, leading efforts to increase the diffusion of renewable energy into China, India, Indonesia and the Philippines. After leaving NREL, Professor Thompson became the executive director of the International Institute for Energy Conservation (IIEC) and later served as Director of the Office of Energy at the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). At the State Department’s​ climate change office, he managed the multimillion dollar climate program portfolio and served as lead U.S. climate negotiator at the United Nations. Professor Thompson is currently Director of the Office of Electricity and Energy Efficiency in the State Department’s Bureau of Energy resources. His work includes advancing U.S. foreign policy and national security goals in priority countries through the promotion of electricity system reforms and increased access to clean and affordable energy services. He received a B.A. in English from Gonzaga University and a Ph.D in Political Philosophy from Georgetown University.
Erwin Tiongson

Erwin R. Tiongson

Erwin R. Tiongson is Professor in the Practice of International Affairs and Concentration Chair for International Development in the Master of Science in Foreign Service (MSFS) Program at Georgetown University’s Walsh School of Foreign Service. He concurrently serves as Deputy Director of the MSFS Program. Prior to joining Georgetown in 2014, Erwin was a Senior Economist at the World Bank and served in the Europe and Central Asia Region and, more recently, in the Latin America and Caribbean Region. He first joined the World Bank in 2003 through its Young Professionals Program. He also served as staff member of the International Monetary Fund from 1997-2003 and served as Associate Professor at the Asian Institute of Management from 2009-2011, where he remains a Nonresident Research Fellow. He is a Research Fellow of Das Institut zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA) (Institute for the Study of Labor), External Research Fellow of the Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM) at the University College London, and Senior Fellow of the Institute for the Study of International Migration (ISIM). Erwin holds a Ph.D. and an M.Phil. in Economics from The George Washington University, an M.P.P. from Georgetown University, an M.A. in Economics from Fordham University, and a B.A. in Philosophy from the Ateneo de Manila University. He was born and raised in Nueva Vizcaya, Philippines.

Charles Udomsaph

Charles Udomsaph

Charles Udomsaph is Associate Professor of Teaching in the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University and teaches the econometrics sequence for the Global Human Development Program. Since 2003, Professor Udomsaph has worked for the World Bank, most recently with the Africa, Latin America & Caribbean, and South Asia Regions. Completed projects range from data collection and capacity building in Cameroon to the implementation of enterprise surveys in Southeast Asia. His current research focuses on private sector development in transition economies, specifically the quantitative assessment of the local business environment in Eastern Europe and its impact on job creation and firm productivity over time. He is a graduate of Georgetown University’s BSFS/MSFS program and holds a PhD in Economics from the University of California, Berkeley.

Holly Wise

Holly Wise

Professor Wise leads the GHD/SFS Global Social Enterprise and Innovation Fellows Program and supports the SFS NetImpact chapter. Her teaching areas include social enterprise, innovation, enterprise development, and the year long Capstone Course entitled Management, Analysis and Practice in Global Development. Research and advisory activities focus on corporate social responsibility, public-private partnerships, leadership development, social enterprise case studies, and monitoring and evaluation of multi-stakeholder alliances. Professor Wise serves as a senior associate at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, and a senior fellow at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government (2006-2011). She sits on the boards of FHI360, Grassroots Business Partners, Worldwide Responsible Accredited Production (WRAP), LivingGoods, and GlobalGiving. Ms. Wise is also a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. She spent a career in the foreign service with the US Agency for International Development (USAID), achieving the diplomatic rank of Minister Counselor. She is the founder and first Secretariat Director of the Global Development Alliance, USAID’s business model that forges strategic alliances between public and private partners in addressing international development issues. In addition to overseas tours in Uganda, Kenya, Barbados, the Philippines and China, Ms. Wise served as USAID chair at the National Defense University where she taught political science, environmental courses, and published research on China. Professor Wise is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Connecticut College and holds advanced degrees from Yale University and the National Defense University.