All Faculty

Marko_Klasnja

Marko Klašnja

Marko Klašnja is an assistant professor of political science at Georgetown University, with the joint appointment in the Government Department and the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service. He specializes in comparative politics, political behavior, and political economy of democratic accountability. Prior to joining Georgetown, he was a post-doctoral fellow at the Center for the Study of Democratic Politics at Princeton University, and received his PhD from the Department of Politics at New York University.

Jeremy Konyndyk

Jeremy Konyndyk

Jeremy Konyndyk is a senior policy fellow at the Center for Global Development. His research focuses on humanitarian response, USAID policy reform, and global outbreak preparedness. He previously served in the Obama Administration from 2013-2017 as the director of USAID’s Office of US Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA), where he led the US government’s response to international disasters. Konyndyk led a global team of nearly 600 humanitarian professionals, managed annual resources of more than $1.4 billion, and oversaw OFDA’s responses to an average of 70 disasters in 50 countries every year. He led major US government humanitarian responses to the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, the 2016 Ethiopia Drought, the complex emergency in Northern Nigeria, the Nepal earthquake, the Iraq crisis, Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines, the conflict in South Sudan, and the ongoing war inside Syria, among other crises. He also led the Agency’s preparations for the 2016 World Humanitarian Summit. Konyndyk previously worked for Mercy Corps as director of Global Policy and Advocacy. From 2008-2013, he led the organization’s high-level strategic outreach to governments, donors, the United Nations, and other partners. From 2003-2008, he served as the American Refugee Committee’s country director in South Sudan, Uganda, and Guinea, designing and leading humanitarian responses in conflict and post-conflict settings. Konyndyk earlier worked with the US Department of State’s Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration, and for an NGO in the Balkans. He is currently a member of the World Health Organization’s high level Independent Oversight and Advisory Committee, which oversees the agency’s Health Emergencies Programme. Previously, he served on the independent Advisory Group to the WHO Director General that helped to design the agency’s post-Ebola emergency response reforms.

Sarah Lane

Sarah Lane

Sarah Lane is an economist in the USAID Office of Economic Policy. She has worked as a development economist for nearly a decade in USAID’s Asia Near East Bureau and Bureau for Economic Growth, Education and Environment. In recent years, she has worked extensively on the economic analysis of development projects with a particular focus on cost benefit analysis. She holds a B.S. in Mathematics and International Relations from the College of William and Mary, an M.A. in International Political Economy and Development from Fordham University, and an M.A. in Economics from Georgetown University.

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Muthukumara Mani

Muthukumara Mani is a Lead Economist in the Office of the Chief Economist of the World Bank’s South Asia Region. He primarily works on climate change mitigation and adaptation issues, water and environmental issues in the region. Prior to joining the region, he led the World Bank’s work on assessing environmental implications of development policy reforms in the Environment Global Practice of the World Bank. His work also has focused on country environmental assessments; natural resources management; environmental institutions and governance; climate change and adaptation; and trade and climate change issues. Prior to joining this position, he was an economist in the Fiscal Affairs Department of the International Monetary Fund, where he was responsible for analyzing environmental implications of macroeconomic policies and programs and in integrating environmental considerations broadly in the country programs. Dr. Mani has numerous books, policy reports and journal articles to his credit. He has a doctorate and masters in economics from the University of Maryland, College Park.

Katherine Marshall

Katherine Marshall

Katherine Marshall has worked for almost four decades on international development, with a focus on issues facing the world’s poorest countries. She is a senior fellow at Georgetown’s Berkley Center for Religion, Peace and World Affairs and Professor of the Practice of Development, Conflict, and Religion in the School of Foreign Service. Her long career with the World Bank (1971-2006) involved a wide range of leadership assignments, many focused on Africa. From 2000-2006 her mandate covered ethics, values, and faith in development work,as counselor to the World Bank’s President. She was Country Director in the World Bank’s Africa region, first for the Sahel region, then Southern Africa. She then led the Bank’s work on social policy and governance during the East Asia crisis years. She worked extensively on Eastern Africa and Latin America. As a long time manager she was involved in many task forces and issues, among them exercises addressing leadership issues, conflict resolution, the role of women, and issues for values and ethics. Ms. Marshall has been closely engaged in the creation and development of the World Faiths Development Dialogue (WFDD) and is its Executive Director. She serves or has served on the Boards of several NGOs and advisory groups, including AVINA Americas, The International Shinto Foundation, the Niwano Peace Prize International Selection Committee, and the Opus Prize Foundation. She was part of the founding members of IDEA (International Development Ethics Association) and is part of the International Anti-Corruption Advisory Conference (IACC) advisory council. She is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. She served as a core group member of the Council of 100, an initiative of the World Economic Forum to advance understanding between the Islamic World and the West. She was a Trustee of Princeton University (2003-9). She co-moderated the Fes Forum which is part of the Fes Festival of World Sacred Music from its inception. She speaks and publishes widely on issues for international development. Ms. Marshall’s daughter is a physician in Seattle in family practice, following service in the Peace Corps. Her son recently completed an assignment with Americorps, writes about and performs electronic music, and is taking courses in computer science at Georgetown University.
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Nick Martin

Nick Martin is an educator, technologist, and social entrepreneur. He is the founder and CEO of TechChange, an award-winning Washington DC-based social enterprise that provides online training on a variety technology and global development topics. The TechChange model for virtual training has been featured in the New York Times, Forbes, Economist, Fast Company and more. Nick is also an adjunct faculty member at Columbia, Georgetown, and GW Universities where he has taught over 60 graduate-level short courses on the role of technology and global development and international affairs in the last ten years. Nick serves on the board of PopTech, a global network committed to the vanguard of emerging technology, science, exploration and creative expression, founded by former Apple CEO John Sculley and Bob Metcalfe, the founder of Ethernet. Nick is a PopTech Social Innovation Fellow (2013), an Ariane de Rothschild Fellow (2014), and an International Youth Foundation Global Fellow (2009). Nick received his BA with honors from Swarthmore College and holds an MA in Peace Education from the United Nations University for Peace (UPEACE).

Rehana Nathoo

Rehana Nathoo

Rehana is the Founder and CEO of Spectrum Impact, a strategy consulting company that supports a range of organizations, funds, and families that are looking to expand their impact investing footprint. Prior to this, Rehana led the impact investing portfolio at the Case Foundation and worked with Bank of New York Mellon to create a pilot impact investment fund, while also training their wealth management team on impact-related strategies. She led grant-making at the Rockefeller Foundation related to impact investing and spent the 2 years prior to that focused on project finance in East Africa with the UN Capital Development Fund. Rehana currently serves an adjunct professor at Georgetown’s Walsh School of Foreign Service on impact investing and global development.

Mead Over

Mead Over

Mead Over is a senior fellow at the Center for Global Development researching the economics of efficient, effective, and cost-effective health interventions in developing countries. Much of his work since 1987, first at the World Bank and now at the CGD, is on the economics of the AIDS epidemic. He co-authored the Bank’s first comprehensive treatment of the economics of AIDS in the book “Confronting AIDS: Public Priorities for a Global Epidemic” (1997,1999). His most recent book is “Achieving an AIDS Transition: Preventing Infections to Sustain Treatment” (2011) in which he offers options for donors, recipients, activists and other participants in the fight against HIV to reverse the trend in the epidemic through better prevention. In addition to ongoing work on HIV/AIDS, he is working on optimal pricing of health care services at the periphery, on the measurement and explanation of the efficiency of health service delivery in poor countries, and on optimal interventions to control a global influenza pandemic. Professor Over serves as a member of PEPFAR’s Scientific Advisory Board and as a member of the Steering Committee of the HIV/AIDS modeling consortium funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. He earned his PhD in economics at the University of Wisconsin, and served in the US Peace Corps’ first program in Burkina Faso. He has taught at Williams College, Boston University, and the University of the Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand, France.

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George Psacharopoulos

George Psacharopoulosis known world-wide for his major contributions to the development of the economics of education. After receiving his M.A. and Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago, he taught at the Universities of Hawaii, Chicago and the London School of Economics.  He served at the World Bank as Senior Advisor to the Vice President, Human Capital and Operations Policy, Chief of the Human Resources Division and Chief of the Education Research Division.  Psacharopoulos conducted policy dialogues at the highest level with the governments of several countries. He was awarded the Outstanding Scholarship Award of the Comparative and International Education Society, of which he later also was Executive Director.  He can look back at over 40 years of academic and operational work in educational planning, manpower training, cost-benefit analysis of investments in education, school financing, poverty assessments and education project design and evaluation. He contributed to the theoretical and empirical international literature in these fields by means of over 300 publications, many of which appear in reading lists for courses in economics, education and sociology around the world. He has written or edited more than 30 books, monographs and encyclopedia articles on the economics of education.  His journal articles have been published by countless journals, including the Journal of Political Economy, the European Economic Review, the Review of Economics and Statistics, the Review of Economic Studies, the Journal of Human Resources, the Economics of Education Review and Education Economics. His works have been cited over 30,000 times.

Laura Rawlings

Laura B. Rawlings

Laura B. Rawlings is a Lead Social Protection Specialist at the World Bank currently working primarily in Africa on strengthening social protection and labor systems. She was previously the Strategy and Results team leader in the World Bank’s Social Protection and Labor unit and manager of the Strategic Impact Evaluation Fund (SIEF). She worked in the Latin American and Caribbean region where she led numerous project and research initiatives in the areas of conditional cash transfers, social funds and social protection systems; and worked as Sector Leader for Human Development in Central America where she was responsible for coordinating the World Bank’s health, education and social protection portfolio. She began her career at the World Bank in the Development Research Group where she worked on the evaluation of social programs. Prior to joining the World Bank she worked for the Overseas Development Council. An economist by training, she has published books and articles in the fields of evaluation and human development.